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CSSL Surf Movie and CI Board demo Saturday the 9th... read on for details

MY EYES WON'T DRY III

A Surf Movie By Brian Conely
Saturday October 9th 6:30pm
O’Neill Surf Shop Parking Lot on 41stAve
Raffle to Benefit
The Core Scholastic Surf League
Free Admission, Food and Drinks
 
For More Info 831-475-4151
 
And....

The Channel Islands Surfboards Demo is also Saturday the 9th 9am - 1pm at Pleasure point. Demo is Free.  Photo idea required. Look for the white CI Van.

Slideshow of some of the photo's from Sunday...

Amber gives us a quick rundown on Red Tide for the San Mateo Coast

Rocky asked Amber Johnson, Kalea's mom to give us a quick run down on the question of surfing and Red Tide's on the San Mateo Coast. Amber is atrained Biologist and the Undergraduate Laboratory Manager at San Francisco State University...

 


 

I am so glad that Rocky asked me to address the phenomena of “red tides” with you.  Red tide is a general term given when a group of protista reproduce so much that they actually change the color of the ocean (follow the link for more images of last years red tide).  These protista are generally in one of the following groups; the dinoflagellates or the diatoms.  A general term for these organisms is phytoplankton which refers to single celled organisms that make their own food (like a plant) and float around in the ocean.  The ocean actually changes color because these organisms are colored so they can photosynthesize (the same reason that trees are green).  Why am I so eager to cover this topic with you?  Well during the course of my graduate studies in marine biology I had the pleasure of working in a Phytoplakton Ecology lab at the Romberg Tiburon Center for the Environmental Sciences.  I spent three years working with relatives of the organisms that are coloring our water red and in general, phytoplankton never ceases to amaze me. 

 

red tide at the Jetty 2009

Phytoplankton are single celled microorganisms that live in the ocean (there are freshwater species as well).  They are not animals or plants, yet they have characteristics of both.  Many photosynthesize, meaning they make their own food, like plants.  Many also are motile, meaning they move around like animals.  Most are incredibly beautiful and have inspired many artists to try to recreate their intricate shapes and patterns.  Phytoplankton are ALWAYS found along our coastline and in fact they are considered to be at the base of our food chain.  Without these microorganisms to fuel the critters that live in the sea, the entire food chain in the ocean would collapse. 

 

You might be wondering, if these microorganisms always exist, why is our coastline blood red right now?  In your garden, if you add water, sunlight, and nutrients (often in the form of fertilizer) you get increased growth.  The same is true in the ocean.  Right now we have the perfect conditions to grow phytoplankton.  We have warm sunny conditions and we have freshwater runoff which happens to carry lots of nutrients from the local farm lands (in other parts of the year we have upwelling, which provides fresh nutrient rich water – but that is a story for another day).  In periods like these, the phytoplankton bloom and reach such densities that they color the water. 

 

Here is a question that many of you have:  is my child in any danger?  The simple answer in NO:  in my opinion, right now it is fine to surf in phytoplankton.  There may be hundreds of different types of microorganisms that form these phytoplankton blooms or “red tides”.  Of these only a few dozen create toxins that can kill fish, birds and even people.  These are called Harmful Algal Blooms or HAB’s.  Along the coast of California, the only way for you to ingest enough of these toxins to have a lethal outcome, is though bioaccumulation.  Bioaccumulation is when an animal ingests the toxin and stores the toxin in their tissues (often not hurting the animal) then the human ingests many of the animals that previously consumed the toxin, thereby accumulated lots of the toxin into the human tissues.  This is why we don’t eat shellfish caught during a HAB.  This is VERY general explanation of a HAB.  HAB’s actually refer to any bloom that causes harm.  The harm can be caused by a toxin or can cause harm in a number of other ways which I can tell you about at another time.  Some of you may have heard of blooms in the Gulf of Mexico and in the Mid Atlantic which release toxic aerosols into the air and caused mild irritation to the eyes and throat of people swimming in the water.  While this is true, at the time of this writing we do not have these species of HAB along our coastline.      

 

Now you know, just because you see a phytoplankton bloom, you are NOT necessarily seeing a HAB.  A majority of what blooms along our coast is the normal phytoplankton that is necessary to fuel our food chain and keep our ocean’s ecosystem healthy and thriving.

 

Happy Surfing! 

 

Skate Contest at Nor-Cal Surf Shop this saturday...

Rumor has it there will be a skate contest in Pacifica at Nor-Cal Surf Shop tomorrow 9/11/2010 at 1:00pm (for more details you may want to call ahead...

2 divisions: Under 16 and Over 16.
Cash and prizes.   if you're interested show up....

Some of the lads in Ireland, homeland to the Bloomers... ridin big waves.

The end of summer last practice and a south swell...

Konrads GoPro day 2

Hunter tries out the new HD Go Pro camera...

Initial Photos from Schralpfest at Pleasure Point...

 

Hopefully more pictures will show up and get added later...

What to do when you are alone on a beautiful left ...

Beautiful conditions ... and mind boggling airs!

2009-2010 Middle School Comp Photos

 

A look back at the 2009-2010 season and events...

updates 4/2: Some Pics from Rockview...

Thanks Pauline & Rod ... more to come as we get them!

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